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Digital Imaging

Digital X-Ray

Digital X-ray or radiography uses a very small dose of ionizing radiation to produce pictures of the body's internal structures. X-rays are the oldest and most frequently used form of medical imaging. They are often used to help diagnosed fractured bones, look for injury or infection and to locate foreign objects in soft tissue. Some x-ray exams may use an iodine-based contrast material or barium to help improve the visibility of specific organs, blood vessels, tissues or bone.

Abdomen X-Ray

Abdominal x-ray uses a very small dose of ionizing radiation to produce pictures of the inside of the abdominal cavity. It is used to evaluate the stomach, liver, intestines and spleen and may be used to help diagnose unexplained pain, nausea or vomiting. When used to examine the kidneys, ureters and bladder, it's called a KUB x-ray. Because abdominal x-ray is fast and easy, it is particularly useful in emergency diagnosis and treatment.

This exam requires little to no special preparation. Tell your doctor and the technologist if there is a possibility you are pregnant, you have an intrauterine device (IUD), or you have recently had a barium sulfate contrast material x-ray or taken medicines such as Pepto Bismol. Leave jewelry at home and wear loose, comfortable clothing. You may be asked to wear a gown.

Bone X-Ray

Bone x-ray uses a very small dose of ionizing radiation to produce pictures of any bone in the body. It is commonly used to diagnose fractured bones or joint dislocation. Bone x-rays are the fastest and easiest way for your doctor to view and assess bone fractures, injuries and joint abnormalities.

This exam requires little to no special preparation. Tell your doctor and the technologist if there is any possibility you are pregnant. Leave jewelry at home and wear loose, comfortable clothing. You may be asked to wear a gown.

A bone x-ray is used to:

  • diagnose fractured bones or joint dislocation.
  • demonstrate proper alignment and stabilization of bony fragments following treatment of a fracture.
  • guide orthopedic surgery, such as spine repair/fusion, joint replacement and fracture reductions.
  • look for injury, infection, arthritis, abnormal bone growths and bony changes seen in metabolic conditions.
  • assist in the detection and diagnosis of bone cancer.
  • locate foreign objects in soft tissues around or in bones.